A special museum under the sea


m-5-

An underwater museum may sound fun in theory, but the story behind Europe’s first submerged sculpture exhibition is quite somber.

Cancun Underwater Museum MUSA It is a Non-Profit Organization based in Cancun México devoted to the Art of Conservation. This museum has a total of 500 sculptures with three different galleries submerged between three and six meters started in 2009 and completed at the end of 2013. A series of sculptures by Jason deCaires Taylor and five other Mexican sculptors of the Cancún National Marine Park. The museum was thought up by Marine Park Director Jaime Gonzalez Canto with the help of sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor.

Three galleries have been created, two underwater and one on the land. MUSA obtained a permit to sink 1,200 structures in 10 different areas within the National Marine Park. So far only two have been developed, Manchones reef with 477 sculptures and Punta Nizuc with 23 beautiful structures.

To get the statues underwater Jason deCaires Taylor had a special lift made for the statues so none would be damaged during the move. Once the statues are brought to the sea and to where they will be placed a forty-ton crane was placed on a commercial ferry. Some statues were so heavy they had to be lifted into the water using lift bags, which are bags of air to help control the position of the statue in the right spot. The third exhibit room is in a Mall, Plaza Kukulcán, with 26 replicas and original. You may find the original ceramic sculpture by Roberto Díaz Abraham named The Ocean Muse. Roberto Díaz Abraham is Co-founder of MUSA together with Dr. Jaime González Cano, the Director of the Marine Park.

DeCaires Taylor has created similar underwater-sculpture projects in bodies of water in Mexico and the Bahamas, as well as in England’s River Thames. The Lanzarote project, which PBS News Hour reports is funded by the government, focuses on Europe’s refugee crisis and includes several installations of refugee sculptures.

“Drawing parallels between the abandonment suffered by sailors in his shipwreck scene and the current refugee crisis, the work is not intended as a tribute or memorial to the many lives lost but as a stark reminder of the collective responsibility of our now global community,” deCaires Taylor wrote in a Facebook post about the installation.

Here are some pictures of this museum-

Nida Fazali m-17- m-15- m-14- m-13- m-12- m-11- m-10- m-9- m-3- m-4- m-7- m-8- m-2- m-1 m-16-

Here you can watch the video-

Comments

comments